00:00

00:00
Stockholm, Sweden

o.o,0.0

Maria W Horn : Fides Minus

The compositions of Maria W Horn (1989) implement synthetic sound, electroacoustic and acoustic instruments and audiovisual components, often devicing generative and algorithmic processes to control timbre, tuning and texture. She employs a varied instrumentation ranging from analog synthesizers to choir, string instruments, pipe organ and various chamber music formats. Acoustic instruments are often paired with digital synthesis techniques, in order to extend the instruments timbral capacities. Often based on minimalist structures, her music explores the inherent spectral properties of sound and their ability to transcend time and space, reality and dream.

Marias installation work explores the inherent memory and mythologies of specific places or geographic areas and the people that have inhabited them. In her careful work with perceptualities, sound is often connected with structures of light aiming to build acoustic environments where senses interlace.

Julia Soboleva

 

 

 

"Sometimes my work helps me process some complex experiences of my life, but just distancing myself over time makes it obvious, it's never intentional. I like to think of the role of the artist in the creative process as a human USB whose job is to connect to the great source of creative energy and translate it into human language through his work.”

 

 

 

Credit. Julia Soboleva

 

 

 

Julia Soboleva's life is a testament to the transcendent power of art, and her journey as an artist has been a deeply personal and transformative one. Born and raised in the serene landscapes of rural Russia, Julia's early years were steeped in the beauty of the natural world. Her upbringing provided the perfect foundation for her artistic endeavors, fostering a deep connection with nature that would become the hallmark of her work.

Julia Soboleva's art approach is characterized by a harmonious fusion of realism and a touch of surrealism. She believes in capturing the essence of nature's intricacies and translating them onto her canvas with meticulous detail and vivid imagination. Her art serves as a bridge between reality and the ethereal, inviting viewers to step into a world where the ordinary becomes extraordinary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Julia Soboleva (Latvian, b. 1990)
“Three and a quarter”
Credit. Julia Soboleva

 

https://www.apollo-magazine.com

 

 

 

 

Julia's primary reference is the natural world itself. She spends countless hours observing the delicate interplay of light and shadow, the intricacies of flora and fauna, and the ever-changing moods of the environment. These observations become the foundation upon which she builds her compositions, infusing them with a profound sense of authenticity.

Additionally, Julia draws inspiration from a wide array of artists and artistic movements. The works of luminaries such as Claude Monet, with his mastery of capturing the fleeting qualities of light, and Salvador Dalí, whose surreal landscapes continue to inspire her sense of imagination, have had a significant influence on her art.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Julia Soboleva (Latvian, b. 1990)
“Transformation starts from within”
Credit. Julia Soboleva

 

https://www.apollo-magazine.com

 

 

 

Julia Soboleva employs a combination of traditional and digital techniques to bring her visions to life. Her traditional techniques include oil painting and watercolor, both of which allow her to achieve a rich and nuanced palette. She meticulously layers colors and textures, creating depth and dimension in her works. This dedication to detail imbues her art with a profound sense of realism.

In tandem with traditional methods, Julia also embraces digital tools, allowing her to experiment with different styles and expand her creative boundaries. The digital realm offers her the freedom to explore surreal and dreamlike elements, seamlessly blending them into her realistic portrayals of nature.

One of her most celebrated techniques is her ability to use contrasting elements—such as the juxtaposition of vibrant colors against tranquil backgrounds—to create a sense of visual tension that draws viewers deeper into her art.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Julia Soboleva (Latvian, b. 1990)
“Disc Jockey”
Credit. Julia Soboleva

 

https://www.apollo-magazine.com

 

 

 

Julia Soboleva's "The Healing Can Begin" is a captivating piece that encapsulates the essence of renewal and transformation. This artwork is a testament to Julia's ability to infuse her creations with emotion, inviting viewers to delve into the depths of their own experiences.

In "The Healing Can Begin," Julia employs a rich color palette dominated by shades of vibrant green, symbolizing growth, vitality, and the promise of a fresh start. The central image features a delicate and intricately detailed lotus flower, poised to unfurl its petals. The lotus is a powerful symbol in various cultures, often associated with purity, enlightenment, and rebirth. It emerges from the darkness of the water, signifying the emergence from challenging or difficult times.

The background of the artwork is a serene, dreamlike landscape, featuring softly blurred elements that lend an ethereal quality to the scene. A gentle, golden light bathes the entire composition, casting a warm and comforting glow, evoking feelings of hope and healing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Julia Soboleva (Latvian, b. 1990)
“The Healing can Begin”, 2021
Credit. Julia Soboleva


https://psikonauti.tumblr.com

 

 

 

Julia's attention to detail is evident in the way she renders the lotus flower. Each petal is painstakingly depicted, with intricate patterns and textures that draw the viewer's eye inward. This level of precision serves to create a sense of intimacy with the subject, allowing viewers to connect on a deeply emotional level.

The title, "The Healing Can Begin," serves as a poignant reminder of the artwork's underlying message. It suggests that even in the midst of darkness or adversity, there is always the potential for growth and renewal. It conveys a sense of optimism and resilience, encouraging viewers to embrace the idea that healing is not only possible but inevitable.

Julia Soboleva's "The Healing Can Begin" is a masterpiece that transcends the boundaries of traditional art. It is a visual meditation, an invitation to reflect on one's own journey, and a reminder that beauty and transformation can arise from the most challenging circumstances. This artwork serves as a testament to Julia's talent and her ability to capture the profound and timeless aspects of the human experience.

Horses equipment

 

 

 

 

Horses have been used in warfare for centuries, and throughout history, various defense equipment has been developed and utilized to enhance their effectiveness and protect both the rider and the horse on the battlefield. These defense equipment items range from armor for the horse to protective gear for the rider, providing an additional layer of protection during combat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Armor for Man and Horse
Italian, Milan and Brescia
horse armor, ca. 1580–90 and later
Steel, leather, copper alloy, textile
Credigt. Rogers Fund


https://www.metmuseum.org

 

 

 

One of the most iconic pieces of defense equipment used by horses in battle is horse armor, also known as barding. Horse armor is designed to shield the horse's body from enemy attacks such as arrows, spears, and slashing weapons. It typically consists of metal plates or chainmail that cover the horse's chest, neck, sides, and sometimes even the head. The armor is secured to the horse using straps or harnesses, ensuring a snug fit while allowing freedom of movement. Horse armor not only offers physical protection but also serves as a visual deterrent, intimidating adversaries on the battlefield.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Armor for Man and Horse
Italian, Milan and Brescia
horse armor, ca. 1580–90 and later
Steel, leather, copper alloy, textile
Credigt. Rogers Fund


https://www.metmuseum.org

 

 

 

Alongside horse armor, protective gear for the rider is crucial for their defense. A primary piece of equipment is the knight's armor, which covers the entire body, including the head, torso, and limbs. These suits of armor were composed of interlocking metal plates or chainmail, providing comprehensive protection against various types of attacks. The rider's helmet, known as a helm, played a vital role in safeguarding the head from direct blows and projectiles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shaffron (Horse's Head Defense) of Henry II of France
ca. 1490–1500, redecorated 1539
Franco-Italian
Steel, gold, brass
Credit. Rogers Fund


https://www.metmuseum.org

 

 

 

In addition to armor, horses in battle were often equipped with defensive weapons. One such example is the chanfron, a faceplate or mask that protected the horse's head. It typically featured eye slits, allowing the horse to see while shielding its face from potential injuries. The chanfron not only offered protection but also served to intimidate adversaries and deflect or absorb the impact of enemy attacks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crinet
ca. 1480–95; bottom lame and mail fringe, restored ca. 1863–1900
Attributed to Romain des Hursins Italian
Steel
Credit. William H. Riggs


https://www.metmuseum.org

 

 

 

 

To provide further protection for both the horse and the rider, additional equipment such as caparisons and chamfrons were adorned with decorative elements, such as colorful fabrics, heraldic designs, or symbols representing the rider's affiliation or allegiance. These adornments not only served aesthetic purposes but also helped in identifying friendly forces on the chaotic battlefield.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crinet
ca. 1480–95; bottom lame and mail fringe, restored ca. 1863–1900
Attributed to Romain des Hursins Italian
Steel
Credit. William H. Riggs


https://www.metmuseum.org

 

 

 

 

Another crucial piece of defense equipment was the shield. While the shield was primarily used by the rider, it could also be attached to the side of the horse, offering additional protection to both. Shields were usually made of wood or metal and were employed to deflect or block enemy weapons, providing a mobile barrier against incoming attacks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crinet
ca. 1480–95; bottom lame and mail fringe, restored ca. 1863–1900
Attributed to Romain des Hursins Italian
Steel
Credit. William H. Riggs


https://www.metmuseum.org

 

 

 

 

It's important to note that the use of horse armor and defensive equipment varied across different cultures and time periods. The design and materials used depended on the available resources and the strategic needs of the era. As warfare evolved and firearms became dominant, the use of horse armor gradually diminished. However, the legacy of these defense equipment items remains a testament to the ingenuity and resourcefulness of the past in ensuring the safety and resilience of both horse and rider in the heat of battle.

"Angels captured by GoPro" Seoul The Soloist

 

 

 

 

In the vibrant world of contemporary art, one name has been making waves and capturing hearts: Seoul The Soloist. A true enigma in the realm of creative expression, Seoul The Soloist has emerged as a dynamic artist whose work transcends traditional boundaries and embraces a unique blend of cultural influences.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seoul The Soloist, 2023

“Angels captured by GoPro”

Credit. Seoul The Soloist

 

https://twitter.com

 

 

 

 

Seoul The Soloist, an artist whose name itself seems to evoke a harmonious blend of global perspectives, is an individual who has managed to remain mysterious yet impactful in the art scene. Born out of a desire to establish a personal brand that represents both their artistic journey and the city of Seoul, their work showcases a fusion of artistic mediums, drawing from contemporary visual arts, music, and perhaps even performance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seoul The Soloist, 2023

“Angels captured by GoPro”

Credit. Seoul The Soloist

 

https://twitter.com

 

 

 

 

At the core of Seoul The Soloist's art approach lies an unwavering commitment to pushing boundaries. Their pieces often challenge conventional norms, daring viewers to question preconceived notions and embrace the unfamiliar. This artistic philosophy resonates throughout their portfolio, where traditional techniques might seamlessly merge with cutting-edge digital manipulation, creating a dynamic visual dialogue that transcends time and space.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seoul The Soloist, 2023

“Angels captured by GoPro”

Credit. Seoul The Soloist

 

https://twitter.com

 

 

 

 

Cultural identity appears to be a cornerstone of Seoul The Soloist's creative exploration. The artist doesn't merely create art; they embody an ever-evolving fusion of cultures, a true reflection of the globalized world we live in. Elements of their South Korean heritage blend with international influences, resulting in a body of work that mirrors the complexities and beauty of modern identity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seoul The Soloist, 2023

“Angels captured by GoPro”

Credit. Seoul The Soloist

 

https://twitter.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seoul The Soloist, 2023

“Angels captured by GoPro”

Credit. Seoul The Soloist

 

https://twitter.com

 

 

 

 

But who is Seoul The Soloist, the individual behind this captivating persona? Despite the intrigue surrounding the artist's identity, what remains clear is their dedication to letting the art speak for itself. In a time where social media often places the spotlight on the artist's personal life, Seoul The Soloist redirects the attention to their creations, allowing the art to establish a genuine connection with its audience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seoul The Soloist, 2022

Credit. Kpopmap

 

https://www.kpopmap.com

Royal Hungarian Salt Mine

 

 

 

The Royal Hungarian Salt Mine of Désakna, also known as the Désakna Salt Mine or the Parajd Salt Mine, is a historic salt mine located in Parajd, Romania. The mine has been in operation for over 500 years and has a rich history and cultural significance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Royal Hungarian Salt Mine of Désakna, Daj, Romania,1940.

https://www.gizmodo.com.au

 

 

 

The mine is situated in the Transylvanian Basin, which is known for its salt deposits. The salt deposits were formed during the Triassic period, over 230 million years ago. The area around the mine has been inhabited since ancient times, and the salt was a valuable commodity used for trade and preservation of food. 

The mine was first mentioned in historical records in 1490, when it was owned by the Hungarian king Matthias Corvinus. The mine was an important source of income for the Hungarian crown and was later passed on to the Habsburg dynasty. The mine continued to operate under various owners throughout the centuries and was expanded in the 18th and 19th centuries. 

The salt from the Désakna mine was highly prized for its purity and was used for a variety of purposes, including preserving food and making medicine. The mine also played an important role in the region's economy, providing jobs and income for local residents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Royal Hungarian Salt Mine of Désakna, Daj, Romania, 1940.

https://www.gizmodo.com.au

 

 

 

In addition to its economic significance, the Désakna Salt Mine also has cultural and historical importance. The mine has been designated a national monument and is considered one of the most important salt mines in Europe. The mine is known for its beautiful salt crystals, which form intricate patterns and shapes on the walls and ceiling of the mine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Royal Hungarian Salt Mine of Désakna, Daj, Romania,1940.

https://www.gizmodo.com.au

 

 

 

Visitors to the mine can take a tour of the underground tunnels and chambers, which extend for over 30 kilometers. The tour includes a visit to the mine's chapel, which is carved entirely out of salt and is one of the most unique features of the mine. The chapel is still used for religious services and is a popular destination for tourists.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Royal Hungarian Salt Mine of Désakna, Daj, Romania,1940.

https://www.gizmodo.com.au

 

 

 

 

The Désakna Salt Mine is also home to a salt therapy center, which uses the mine's salt for therapeutic purposes. The therapy involves inhaling tiny particles of salt, which are said to have a beneficial effect on respiratory and skin conditions.

Mia Bergeron

 

“The realist, if he is an artist, will seek not to show us a banal photograph of life, but to give us a vision more complete, more seizing, more probing than reality itself.” - Mia Bergeron

 

 

 

 

 

Mia Bergeron
Lovers, 2022
Oil on Panel
40,64 x 50,8 cm
Credit. Mia Bergeron
https://www.robertlangestudios.com

 

 

 

Mia Bergeron is a contemporary American artist who is renowned for her figurative paintings that explore themes of intimacy, vulnerability, and human connection. Born in 1978 in New York, Bergeron grew up in a family of artists and was exposed to the world of art from an early age. She received her formal training in painting and drawing from the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) and also studied at the Charles H. Cecil Studios in Florence, Italy.

Bergeron's art approach is deeply rooted in traditional techniques and methods of painting, which she combines with her own unique vision and personal style. Her works often feature female figures that are depicted in a highly realistic manner, yet with a subtle emotional depth that suggests a sense of introspection and contemplation. Bergeron's paintings are characterized by a mastery of color, light, and composition, and are often executed with a careful attention to detail and a meticulous approach to brushwork.

One of Bergeron's major influences is the work of the Old Masters, particularly the 17th-century Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer. Like Vermeer, Bergeron is interested in capturing the fleeting moments of everyday life, and her paintings often feature women engaged in mundane activities such as reading, sewing, or simply gazing out of a window. Bergeron's use of light and shadow is also reminiscent of Vermeer, and she frequently employs a technique known as chiaroscuro, which emphasizes the contrast between light and dark areas of the painting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Johannes Vermeer
Allegory of the Catholic Faith, 1670
Oil on Canvas
114.3 x 88.9 cm
Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York)
Credit. Public Domain
https://en.wikipedia.org

 

 

 

 

In addition to Vermeer, Bergeron's work also shows the influence of contemporary figurative artists such as Odd Nerdrum and Jenny Saville. Like Nerdrum, Bergeron is interested in exploring the psychological depths of her subjects, and her paintings often have a dreamlike quality that suggests a sense of mystery or ambiguity. Meanwhile, her approach to the human figure is reminiscent of Saville, whose bold and expressive brushwork emphasizes the physicality and presence of the body.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Johannes Vermeer
Detail of Allegory of the Catholic Faith, 1670
Oil on Canvas
114.3 x 88.9 cm 
Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York)
Credit. Public Domain
https://en.wikipedia.org

 

 

 

 

Bergeron's art technique involves a careful balance between control and spontaneity. She begins each painting with a detailed drawing that serves as the foundation for the composition, and then builds up the paint layer by layer, gradually refining the image over time. She uses a limited palette of colors, which she mixes on her palette to achieve subtle variations in tone and hue. Bergeron also uses a variety of brushes and tools to create different textures and effects, and frequently employs glazes to create a sense of depth and luminosity in her paintings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mia Bergeron
Apparition, 2021
Oil on aluminum
91.4 × 106.7 cm
Credit. Mia Bergeron
https://www.artsy.net

 

 

 

 

One of Bergeron's signature techniques is the use of a gridded underpainting, which she uses to create a precise and accurate drawing of the figure. This technique allows her to capture the anatomical proportions and details of the figure with great accuracy, while also giving her the freedom to experiment with the painting's color and mood. Bergeron's underpainting is usually executed in a warm monochrome tone, which provides a rich base for the subsequent layers of color.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mia Bergeron
Night Songs, 2021
Oil on Panel
22.9 × 30.5 cm
Credit. Mia Bergeron
https://www.artsy.net

 

 

 

 

Mia Bergeron's "Night Songs" is a captivating oil painting that captures the beauty and mystery of a moonlit night. The painting features a solitary figure standing in a clearing, surrounded by dense foliage and towering trees. The figure is shrouded in darkness, with only a hint of moonlight illuminating their form.

One of the most striking aspects of "Night Songs" is Bergeron's masterful use of light and shadow. The painting features a dramatic contrast between the deep shadows of the foliage and the soft, diffused light of the moon. The figure is almost entirely obscured by darkness, with only a few subtle highlights and shadows hinting at their presence. The interplay of light and shadow creates a sense of mystery and ambiguity, inviting the viewer to imagine the story behind the figure in the painting.

Another notable aspect of "Night Songs" is Bergeron's use of color. The painting features a muted color palette dominated by greens and blues, with subtle hints of pink and orange in the foliage. The cool tones of the painting contribute to the sense of mystery and quietness, evoking the tranquility and stillness of a moonlit night.

Bergeron's technique in creating "Night Songs" is precise and controlled. She begins by creating a detailed underpainting, which serves as the foundation for the painting. She then builds up layers of color and texture, carefully refining the details of the foliage and the figure. Bergeron's use of glazes is particularly effective in creating a luminous, glowing quality to the moonlight.

"Night Songs" is part of a larger body of work by Bergeron that explores the theme of solitude and introspection. In these paintings, Bergeron seeks to capture the emotional depth and complexity of being alone, and the transformative power of self-reflection. The paintings are notable for their realism and attention to detail, which is conveyed through Bergeron's skillful use of color, light, and composition.

Whale Valley

 

 

"Wadi Al-Hitan is a unique and fascinating place, a living record of the evolution of life on our planet." - Ahmed Zewail, Nobel Prize-winning Egyptian-American chemist

 

 

 

 

Wadi Al-Hitan (Whale Valley)
Egypt
© UNESCO
https://whc.unesco.org

 

 

Wadi Al-Hitan, also known as Whale Valley, is a remarkable site located in the Western Desert of Egypt. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of the country's most fascinating natural wonders, offering visitors a glimpse into the earth's distant past and the evolution of life on our planet.

 

 

 

 

Wadi Al-Hitan (Whale Valley)
Egypt
©Editions Gelbart
https://whc.unesco.org

 

 

The valley is home to an exceptional collection of fossil remains of whales and other marine creatures that lived around 40 to 50 million years ago, during the Eocene epoch. The fossils found in this valley are considered to be the most significant and complete record of the early stages of whale evolution, which led to the emergence of these majestic creatures as we know them today.

 

 

 

 

Wadi Al-Hitan (Whale Valley)
Egypt
© UNESCO
https://whc.unesco.org

 

 

The site covers an area of around 20 square kilometers and consists of a series of rocky outcrops and cliffs that have been eroded by wind and water over millions of years. The fossils are embedded in the sedimentary rocks and can be seen clearly on the surface, making it easy for visitors to appreciate the scale and diversity of the marine life that once inhabited this area.

 

 

 

 

  

Wadi Al-Hitan (Whale Valley)
Egypt
© Editions Gelbart
https://whc.unesco.org

 

 

One of the most impressive features of Wadi Al-Hitan is the presence of several complete and partially articulated skeletons of ancient whales, including the famous Basilosaurus, a 15-meter long predatory whale with a serpentine body and sharp teeth. Other species of whales that can be found in the valley include Dorudon, a smaller and more primitive ancestor of the modern-day dolphin, and Zygorhiza, a whale with a shorter snout and fluked tail.

 

 

 

 

 

Wadi Al-Hitan (Whale Valley)
Egypt
© Editions Gelbart
https://whc.unesco.org

 

 

In addition to the natural wonders of Wadi Al-Hitan, the site is also of great cultural and historical significance. The area has been inhabited by various civilizations throughout history, including the pharaonic, Roman, and Islamic periods, and there are several ancient ruins and artifacts that can be seen in the vicinity of the valley.

 

 

 

 

 

Wadi Al-Hitan (Whale Valley)
Egypt
© Ko Hon Chiu Vincent
https://whc.unesco.org

 

 

Overall, Wadi Al-Hitan is a must-see destination for anyone interested in natural history and the evolution of life on our planet. Its unique and breathtaking landscape, combined with its rich collection of fossils and other scientific treasures, make it an unforgettable experience that will leave visitors with a newfound appreciation for the wonders of the natural world.

 

 

"The fossils at Wadi Al-Hitan provide a unique insight into the early stages of whale evolution, shedding light on the adaptations that allowed these creatures to thrive in the oceans." - National Geographic.

Coop Himmelb(l)au

 

 

Coop Himmelblau's exhibition
Architektur ist Jetzt / Architecture is Now
Kunstverein Stuggart, Germany, 1982
© Coop Himmelb(l)au
                                                                                                   

 

 

Coop Himmelb(l)au is an architectural firm founded in Vienna in 1968 by Wolf D. Prix, Helmut Swiczinsky, and Michael Holzer. The name of the firm translates to "Cooperative Sky Blue," with "Himmelblau" referencing a color that symbolizes the sky and the infinite possibilities of design. From the beginning, the group's approach to architecture was unconventional, influenced by the avant-garde movements of the time, such as Pop Art, Minimalism, and Deconstructivism.

 

 

 

 

Villa Rosa
Pneumatic Living Unit — Prototype, 1968
© Coop Himmelb(l)au

 

 

The thinking behind Coop Himmelb(l)au's projects is centered around the idea of challenging conventions and breaking boundaries. They reject the traditional notion of architecture as a static and unchanging entity, instead seeing it as a dynamic, evolving, and interactive form. Their work aims to disrupt preconceived notions of space and to create experiences that are both immersive and thought-provoking.

 

 

 

Opera House Sketch
Malibu, California, 1983
© Coop Himmelb(l)au

 

 

The group's use of technology is a key aspect of their design philosophy. They employ advanced digital tools, including computer-aided design and parametric modeling, to achieve the intricate geometries and complex forms that are characteristic of their work. This use of technology allows them to explore new possibilities in design, and to create structures that were previously impossible to conceive.

 

 

 

 

Cloud three dimensional grid
© Coop Himmelb(l)au

 

 

One of the group's early projects, the exhibition installation Architecture Is Now, showcased their approach to architecture. The installation, which was created in 1982 for the Württembergischer Kunstverein in Stuttgart, Germany, featured a series of large-scale models of buildings that challenged traditional notions of form and function. The installation was designed to be interactive, with visitors encouraged to explore the models and engage with the ideas behind them.

 

 

 

 

Verlag Gerd Hatje, Stuttgart 1983
First published in the USA by Rizzoli International, New York 1983
First published in Great Britain by Thames & Hudson Ltd., London 1984
Foreword: Frank Werner
Texts: Coop Himmelblau
ISBN 0 – 8478-0515 – 8
German/ English

 

 

 

 

Coop Himmelblau's exhibition
Architektur ist Jetzt / Architecture is Now
Kunstverein Stuggart, Germany, 1982
© Coop Himmelb(l)au

 

 

Our architecture is not domesticated. It moves around in urban areas like a panther in a jungle. When it is in a museum, it is like a beast of prey in a cage.” – Coop Himmelb(l)au, 1982

Architecture Is Now, 1982
Exhibition Installation, Württembergischer Kunstverein
Stuttgart, Germany

 

 

Another significant project by Coop Himmelb(l)au is the Falkestrasse Roof, which was completed in 1988. The project involved the renovation and extension of an existing building in Vienna, with a new roof structure added to create a unique and dynamic form. The roof, which appears to float above the building, is made up of a series of curved and angled steel elements that create a complex and intricate geometry.

 

 

 

 

Rooftop Remodeling Falkestrasse
Wien, Austria, 1987-88
Rooftop Remodeling Falkestrasse
Design development
© Coop Himmelb(l)au

 

 

The rooftop remodeling project in this exhibition... is clearly a form that has been distorted by some alien organism, a writhing, disruptive animal breaking through the corner. Some twisted counter-relief infects the orthogonal box. It is a skeletal monster which breaks up the elements of the form as it struggles out. ” - Mark Wigley, 1988

 

Rooftop Remodeling Falkestrasse
Wien, Austria, 1987-88

 

 

The Open House project, completed in 1998, exemplifies Coop Himmelb(l)au's philosophy of challenging conventional notions of space. The project involved the transformation of an existing warehouse in Vienna into a mixed-use development, featuring apartments, offices, and commercial spaces. The building's facade is covered in a mesh of aluminum panels, which can be adjusted to control the amount of light and privacy in each unit. The interior spaces are designed to be flexible and adaptable, with movable walls and sliding partitions allowing residents to customize their living spaces.

 

 

 

 

Opera House
Malibu, California, 1983
Design Development
© Coop Himmelb(l)au

 

 

Created from an explosively drawn design. Drawn with eyes closed. Undistracted concentration, the hand as the seismograph of the feelings, the hand that will awaken the constructed space.” - Coop Himmelb(l)au, 1983.

 

Opera House
Malibu, California, 1983

 

 

The Open House project, completed in 1998, exemplifies Coop Himmelb(l)au's philosophy of challenging conventional notions of space. The project involved the transformation of an existing warehouse in Vienna into a mixed-use development, featuring apartments, offices, and commercial spaces. The building's facade is covered in a mesh of aluminum panels, which can be adjusted to control the amount of light and privacy in each unit. The interior spaces are designed to be flexible and adaptable, with movable walls and sliding partitions allowing residents to customize their living spaces.

 

Overall, Coop Himmelb(l)au's philosophy is characterized by a rejection of traditional architectural conventions in favor of bold, dynamic designs that interact with their environment and challenge the status quo. Their early works, such as the "Architecture Is Now" exhibition installation and the Falkestrasse Roof, exemplify this philosophy and have made Coop Himmelb(l)au one of the most innovative and influential architecture firms of the 20th century. 

Edith Dekyndt: Ombre indigène
Edith Dekyndt is a Belgian artist whose work combines scientific inquiry with poetic sensibility. Her artistic approach is multidisciplinary, drawing from fields such as physics, chemistry, and biology to explore the mysteries of the natural world. Through her art, she explores the relationship between humanity and the environment, and the ways in which we interact with and understand the world around us.
 

Edith Dekyndt
Indigenous Shadow Part. 2
2014
Credit: Edith Dekyndt
https://www.e-flux.com
 
 
 
In 2021, Wiels in Brussels hosted a retrospective exhibition of Dekyndt's work titled "Indigenous Shadow." The exhibition brought together a range of works from throughout her career, showcasing her diverse artistic practice and the evolution of her ideas over time. The exhibition was divided into several distinct sections, each highlighting different aspects of Dekyndt's work and offering a glimpse into her artistic process.
 

Edith Dekyndt
Ombre Indigène
WIELS, Brussels
2016
Credit: Edith Dekyndt
Photos by Sven Laurent
https://www.tique.art
 
 
 
One of the most striking aspects of Dekyndt's work is her use of unconventional materials. For example, in the section of the exhibition titled "Mud," Dekyndt created a series of large-scale paintings using mud and pigments. The paintings are created by layering the mud and pigment onto the canvas and allowing it to dry, creating a textured and nuanced surface that is both beautiful and mysterious. The paintings are an exploration of the primal nature of the earth, and the ways in which we can connect with the natural world through art.
 

Edith Dekyndt
A Portrait of Things
1995-2015
Aquarium with piece of fabric
205 x 120 x 50 cm
Credit: Edith Dekyndt
https://www.tique.art
 
 
 
Another section of the exhibition, titled "Object, Human Hair and Fabric," features a series of sculptures created from found objects and materials. These works are a meditation on the transience of human existence, and the ways in which we create meaning through our interactions with the material world. The sculptures are at once fragile and powerful, with a sense of energy and vitality that is both mesmerizing and haunting.
 

 
Edith Dekyndt
Ombre Indigène
WIELS, Brussels
2016
Credit: Edith Dekynd
Photos by Sven Laurent
https://www.tique.art
 
 
 
Dekyndt's interest in the natural world is also evident in her use of scientific tools and technologies. In the section of the exhibition titled "Variable Dimensions," she created a series of installations using laser light and smoke to create ephemeral and immersive environments. These works are a meditation on the nature of light and space, and the ways in which we can use technology to explore the mysteries of the universe.
 


Edith Dekyndt
The Kingdom (Morsum 11)
2017
Wood, staples, fur
50 x 40 cm
Courtesy Galerie Greta Meert
http://galeriegretameert.com
 
 
 
Overall, "Indigenous Shadow" is a powerful and thought-provoking exhibition that showcases the breadth and depth of Edith Dekyndt's artistic practice. Dekyndt invites us to contemplate the mysteries of the natural world and the ways in which we interact with and understand it. Her work is a testament to the power of art to inspire wonder, awe, and understanding, and to the importance of exploring the mysteries that lie at the heart of our existence.
In conversation with Marc Leschelier and Alberto Deon

To introduce its SS22 collection, Demon partnered with sculptor and architect Marc Leschelier for an installation at Spazio Maiocchi. The event features a conversation between Marc Leschelier and Demon’s creative director, Alberto Deon, freewheeling on the origin and ambitions of their collaboration.

Employing his peculiar artistic vocabulary, Leschelier reinterpreted the brand’s narrative and eclectic research, centered around core values of memory, experimentation, heritage, and territorialization.

 

The talk was hosted by architect and educator Giles Nartey, who curated a selection of questions aimed at discerning the nuances behind the collaboration.

 

 

 

 

 

GN
How did your relationship start?

 

ML
We met in Paris and we started a conversation about architecture and shoe design, especially the evolution of these industries together. I found similar the fact that Demon is using prefabricated soles from Vibram and that we have also in architecture prefabricated elements that we are combining together to produce a new design. My architecture vocabulary is also made of prefabricated elements, and I was curious to see how shoe industry has been capable to produce so much variety and how they succeed to make small capsule collections out of customisations of prefabricated elements. I think architecture industry has a lot to learn from shoe industry.

 

 

 

 

ML 

 

We have the same constraints with the cost of the moulds for example, to produce a mould for concrete blocks is as expensive as the cost for new sole mould. But it seems that shoe industry has been more innovative by importing knowledge from other disciplines, which allow them to expand their vocabulary.

 

 


GL

What about your established method of working have you brought to this collaboration and how has it been different form your previous works?

 

AD


To start off, this work has been the mightiest in Marc’s production so far. Moreover, in this instance he tried combining the two expressive languages that characterise his art: the rigidity of bricklaying on the one hand, and the fluidity of concrete textile on the other. In a way I think I encouraged and facilitated this new expansion in his modus operandi. I hope at least! Personally I was very compelled by the idea of a corral.

 

ML


Alberto gave me a carte blanche, but at the same time our discussions pushed me to bring the vocabulary of the blocks and of the textile together. It hasn't been so different in terms of process for me, but it is changing everything when you have a great commissioner that has the same expectations as you. We wanted to make an architectural installation that will speak for itself. Like a shoe, that generally doesn't need any words to be understood. Which is also something that I was criticising in architecture, it is the distance between the concepts and how things are executed.

 

GN

What is the importance of materiality in your work?

 

ML


Materiality is very important in my work but at the same time it is not the central point. Many people things my work is about cinder blocks and concrete, and about the abraisiveness of this material, which is also true, but actually the main subject of my work is about the practice of architecture. My work is very related to the situation of architecture today. It is a kind of response to this field which has been not anymore considered as a creative act. But on the contrary, a discipline under a whole system of laws that makes it impossible to be free. The message of my work is about freedom, which is something that should be discussed again in the architecture field. Which means that materiality is the vehicle of the message, and not the subject.

 

 

 

 

GN


What are your key references?

 

ML


The works of architecture which has been very important to me, are moments when architecture could become something else. When architecture becomes a sculpture for example. These moments of transformation are rare to observe. For example, when Michelangelo, is building a staircase for the Laurenziana library in Florence, he is building it as a sculptor, the architecture vocabulary becomes somehow blocked by absorbing sculptural properties and qualities.

Windows are blocked, decorative elements are contradicting themselves and the stairs are not attached to the wall but detach like a standing sculpture. And at the same time, my key references belongs also to the art field. Moments of liberation, like the viennese activism, with all the risks it brought on 

AD


My references tend to span from movements and line of thoughts rather than other designers. I think I am inspired by the idea of mannerisms. Mannerism as an attitude more than a movement, it’s a special artistic-born behaviour that rises within the body od work of artistic movements in their maturity and seeks for imperfection to elaborate on. In this sense, it contrasts the status quo of a certain artistic language and probs alternative directions. That’s what I’m trying to do with Demon.

 

GN


What is the relationship between digital and physical in your practice?

 

ML


I'm using the digital to detail and to express my work sometimes, but I use mainly physical models and mock-ups to develop my work. The digital can be as dumb as a way to count easily the blocks I have to use in an installation. I would be interested to use the digital in my work to see how it can propose new practices and possibilities to escape the normative context of architecture. But for the moment, I'm focused on the development of a physical vocabulary. Which is engaging myself in a thinking where I have to built another meaning out of prefabricated architectural vocabulary.

 

 

 

AD


Coming from architecture education, I digested so much digital simulation that when I approached this project I was reluctant to approach design via any sort of screen. I significantly prefer to explore the raw materials and work design ideas from the ground up, starting from physical instances and scraps of materials, soles, minuteria. So I can - say - start from a sculptural phase in which I condense feelings and impressions into matter without caring about serialisation. After this phase there is the “pain” phase in which I have to review the chimeras I created and reverse-engineer an industrialised version. Nonetheless I don’t exclude hybridising my work method with digital tools, I’m thinking especially of 3D modelling. I hope to interweave these two realms and start working in a “phygital” process that allows me to maximise both inputs. On the other hand, I’ve used in the past digital tools to enhance our communication, but I see digital alteration and technologies becoming increasingly less relevant as the brand grows; I’d rather allow the products speak for themselves. Because it is products we’re dealing with at the end of the day.

 

GN


How do you relate to the concept of community, and how does it affect your practice?

 

ML


I think a community is very important, to not feel alone and isolated in your own desires. But I have to say that I don't see a lot of architects who wants to be out of the system of architecture. I don't want to be only considered as an artist or a sculptor, I want also to be considered as an architect, and someone who is engaged in the act of construction and in the development and expansion of architecture vocabulary.

 

 

AD


Design is rarely revolving around design. Or better, design is just one side of design as a cultural expression. What gives meaning to design are the social attributes that it stems from, and the social groups it represents. It’s much broader than a pencil dictating shapes on a sheet, the nuances are much more than what floats in a Rhino7 interface, no matter how equipped with state of the art plugins. To a certain degree over-design leads to boredom. Now more than ever forms need to become (de)sign, thus “sign-ify” something other than the form in and of its own.

I’m discovering the very meaning of the idea of community very recently. I think having debuted in this market via Slam Jam is having a huge impact on my understanding of fashion. In a way, the cultural load of a certain community represents the other half of design. Social status, value systems, lifestyle, group membership all encompass the anthropological load of a certain piece of design. Nowadays, with all sorts of industrial facilitation, giving shape to object and its degree of aesthetic specificity is unprecedented. This undermines the gesture of design tout-court, and moves the focus to what that specific shape represents, what values and feelings it broadcasts. Communities are catalysts for this process to happen.

 

GN


You both come from an architectural background, in which way has the concept of manifesto is still relevant in the 21st century?

 

ML


It's true that manifestos are very important in the architecture history. Architecture has been structured and pushed by the treatises and manifestos, but it seems that today they are less popular and written. It is related to our epoch, which doesn't have any time left for reading and writing thoughts, everything is about immediacy and visual communication. It's almost the model of telepathy. Everything should be direct and consumed with no patience. Sad or not ? I don't know, we're probably losing a lot but it is the rules of our time and everyone can still make great work out of this context.

 

 

AD


Manifestos are rooted in a context in which ideas in and of their own had a much grander allure. Discussing ideas even when this implied dwelling on tortuous intellectual mazes was an important process in the act of generating culture. I think nowadays this procedure has fallen apart, in favour of immediacy. Mostly because liberalism thrives on novelty and novelty requires speed and momentum. I am inspired by the old usage of creating a “Corpus Theoreticus” before putting things into the world, that’s why I always try to test my ideas in my mouth. Speak them out loud, looking for syllogistical immediacy between thoughts, cause I know that will result in a clearer vision.

Cart (0) [Accessories] [Boots] [Shoes] [All]
[Accessories]
[Boots] [Shoes] [All]

Cart

Your bag is empty

POYANA BOOT WHITE - black outsole

POYANA BOOT WHITE - black outsole .

POYANA BOOT WHITE - black outsole
POYANA BOOT WHITE - black outsole
POYANA BOOT WHITE - black outsole
POYANA BOOT WHITE - black outsole
POYANA BOOT WHITE - black outsole
POYANA BOOT WHITE - black outsole
POYANA BOOT WHITE - black outsole
POYANA BOOT WHITE - black outsole

POYANA BOOT WHITE - black outsole .

$541.00

$541.00
Vegetable-Tanned Leather Upper
Hot-Pressed Logo and Brand's Claim
Round Toe with eFoam Protection Binding
Waterproof Double-Lasting Construction
Reflex Sock Webbing
Sock-Lining Stretch Nylon Gaiter
Speed-Lace Metal Hardware
Removable Space-Shell Footbed
Extra Light Vibram Rubber Outsole
Handcrafted in Italy
Demon is the requalification of a former reality. Ignited in 1963 in Montebelluna by Girolamo Deon, the brand re-emerged in 2020 with a brand new vision, guided by Alberto Deon, aimed at expressing the vernacular legacy of its territory within the language of contemporary design. Te brand's grounded industrial history allows it to investigate the interweaving threads of technical solutions and avant-garde taste, maintaining a fascination of its heritage while undertaking a dirsuptive reinterpretation of it.